Never forget our people were always free : a parable of American healing
(Book)

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Status
Gainesville Public Library - Silver Springs - Adult Nonfiction
323.092 Jea
1 available
Livonia Public Library - Adult Nonfiction
323.09 JEA
1 available
Macedon Public Library - Adult Nonfiction
323.09 JEA
1 available

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LocationCall NumberStatus
Gainesville Public Library - Silver Springs - Adult Nonfiction323.092 JeaAvailable
Livonia Public Library - Adult Nonfiction323.09 JEAAvailable
Macedon Public Library - Adult Nonfiction323.09 JEAAvailable

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Format
Book
Physical Desc
x, 243 pages ; 24 cm
Language
English

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages 239-243).
Description
"'One of the nation's most prominent civil rights leaders' (Washington Post), a New York Times bestselling author, community organizer, investigative journalist, Ivy League professor, and former head of the NAACP, Ben Jealous draws from a life lived on America's racial fault line to deliver a series of gripping and lively parables that call on each of us to reconcile, heal, and work fearlessly to make America one nation. Never Forget Our People Were Always Free illuminates for each of us how the path to healing America's broken heart starts with each of us having the courage to heal our own. The son of parents who had to leave Maryland because their cross-racial marriage was illegal, Ben Jealous' lively, courageous and empathetic storytelling calls on every American to look past deeply-cut divisions and recognize we are all in the same boat now. Along the way Jealous grapples with hidden American mysteries, including: Why do white men die from suicide more often than black men die from murder? How did racial profiling kill an American president? What happens when a Ku Klux Klansman wrestles with what Jesus actually said? How did Dave Chappelle know the DC Snipers were Black? Why shouldn't the civil rights movement give up on rednecks? When is what we have collectively forgotten about race more important than what we actually know? What do the most indecipherable things our elders say tell us about ourselves? Told as a series of parables, Never Forget Our People Were Always Free features intimate glimpses of political, and faith leaders as different as Jack Kemp, Stacey Abrams, and the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu and heroes as unlikely as a retired constable, a female pirate from Madagascar, a long lost Irishman, a death row inmate, and a man with a confederate flag over his heart. More than anything, Never Forget Our People Were Always Free offers readers hope America's oldest wounds can heal and her oldest divisions be overcome"--,Provided by publisher.

Citations

APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Jealous, B. T. (2023). Never forget our people were always free: a parable of American healing (First edition.). Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Jealous, Benjamin Todd, 1973-. 2023. Never Forget Our People Were Always Free: A Parable of American Healing. New York, NY: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Jealous, Benjamin Todd, 1973-. Never Forget Our People Were Always Free: A Parable of American Healing New York, NY: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2023.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Jealous, Benjamin Todd. Never Forget Our People Were Always Free: A Parable of American Healing First edition., Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2023.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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